Models and Displays

If you feel like it, you can add up the total aircraft and engines on display, but we have lost count of the number of models that we feature. Some stand alone, such as:

 

Bush planes and trainers

“Flying” in the lobby.

 

 

 

deHavilland “Tiger Moth”

The iconic basic trainer from the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

 

 

 

Bellanca “Air Cruiser”

A utility plane from the 1930s.

 

 

 

Supermarine S-6B

The racing seaplane that laid the ground for Mitchell’s “Spitfire”.

 

 

 


Displays

Most of our models are part of the numerous displays featured by the Museum. This is not a definitive list, but the following shows the range of our displays:

 

A tribute to Avro Canada

...and the “Arrow” in particular.

 

 

 

Aerial Firefighters’ Corner

Models of significant water-based fire bombers.

 

 

 

Airlines of Canada

...including the “Fashion Show”.

 

 

 

The Broomfield Collection

Second World War aircraft of all nations.


 

 

The “Fugo Balloon”

A Second World War inter-continental strike weapon.

 

 

 

Link Trainers

Pre-computer simulators of different vintages.

 

 

 

Memorial Room

A collection of memorabilia of Canadian military aviation of two World Wars plus a feature on the Patricia Bay base.

 

 

 

Various Canadian military aircraft types

Model and photographic displays of fighters, maritime patrol, transports, etc., plus a couple of “Falcon” missiles.

 

 

 

The Propeller Collection

All shapes, sizes and conditions.

 

 

 

Early Airborne Radar

It needed a big aeroplane!

 

 

 

Tribute to “The Snowbirds” Aerobatic Team

 


 

 

Wood & Canvas wing structure

A sample aerofoil at various stages of construction.

 

 

 


Things we're working on...

A final word about our forthcoming tribute to the Douglas DC-3 and its military counter-part the C-47, which many think were the most important aircraft ever built. The civilian prototype first flew in December 1935 and its selection as a standard military transport in World War II guaranteed that over 10,000 would be built. A few civilian ones are still in service.

We salvaged a C-47 forward fuselage from a so-called “Super Dakota” airframe in poor condition that had been abandoned on Victoria Airport. It is currently outside the Restoration Hangar awaiting being converted into an inter-active exhibit.

When you visit us, please allow enough time to take it all in!

 


 

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